Marketing the Right Products – David Twiggs

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I was speaking recently at the American Association of Retirement Communities national conference in Memphis about “Repositioning the Large Scale Community to be Relevant in Today’s Market” and was asked about effective marketing campaigns. Once you understand your market and have positioned your community to authentically serve relevant lifestyle options, there are some excellent media resources out there for marketing your community.    Ideal Living magazine as a great national example and Center for Carolina Living is a regional platform. However, I quickly turned our discussion to the much-overlooked fact that these media outlets can only convey the story you supply. Marketing can never make up for a product problem and many of our communities have a product problem.

 

If we continue to advertise a 25-year-old story, we will not be attractive to the coming markets. If we cannot actually deliver authentic and fulfilling lifestyle options relevant to today’s market, we will simply fall into irrelevance. The things that drew the people who moved to your community in the past do not motivate today’s market. Not only are we experiencing the change from silent generation to boomers, we are dealing with post recession value shifts and fragmented media.

 

Fixing a product problem is about finding the unique lifestyle options you can provide and creating those opportunities. I work in rural destination and resort style communities so I look at what markets I can develop in addition to the country club sports model that the original developer banked on. Notice, I said lifestyles in addition to, not replacing what we have. Nothing wrong with an element of the country club model but it better not be the only product you offer. The golf centric community market is saturated on all levels and price points but it can still be a strong part of your holistic lifestyle options. If a program you offer is no longer relevant, it will die a natural death. Who is building a new shuffleboard stadium? No one, they are  irrelevant. You had better have lifestyle options relevant to the coming market to attract new growth. We should protect the elements of our lifestyle we love and add complimentary lifestyle options that we can authentically provide. Be Unique. Generic and boring are well represented in the market. You are not trying to attract everyone only those who want your unique lifestyle.

 

For Hot Springs Village, I have developed a Master Plan Workbook in which we explore possible new lifestyle possibilities, housing typology, engagement brands and community branding. Notice this is titled a workbook not an engraved in stone plan. This is an ever changing document. We explore many ideas for lifestyle and community improvements. We don’t implement them all. Some fit some do not, but we are not afraid to explore all options and are daily improving our formally dated products. If you have a unique product, marketing is much easier. Getting picked out of a mass of similar communities is difficult and often leads to wasting our limited marketing dollars.

 

You are welcome to look at the current version of my Master Plan Work Book for HSV. Please remember it is an ongoing presentation piece so some details and all proprietary information such as market studies for housing, hotel, commercial and retail have been omitted. Each community is unique. You can’t simply copy someone else’s model. Look at your products, understand your market, and make sure your story is relevant before you invest your marketing dollars.

CLICK HERE FOR A PDF Masterplan Workbook 1221.2014 UPDATE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tjFZlnYuFQ

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Accelerating My Social Media Learning Curve

One of my obsessions over the last several years has been seeking ways to maximize the impact of my passions, theories and concepts to create meaningful work. I have always been one to read the books of design thought leaders in efforts to keep on the front of the curve.  In the past 2 years,  this has drawn me into an evermore connected system of blogs, tweets, and photo services,  Seeing how well this information flowed and constantly connected me to new information sources, I took my first steps into the New Media.  This has been daunting to say the least but I think I am getting a handle on it.

I just read New Media for Designers + Builders  (www.nm4db.com.) It’s a new book from Steve Mouzon, architect and author of one of my favorites: The Original Green: Unlocking the Mystery of True Sustainability.  This book breaks from Mouzon’s eclectic discussions of design philosophy and dives directly into the tools we design professionals need to be remarkable in today’s world of new media.  We are deluged with “how to” books on marketing, but to say this is about marketing would not do this work justice.  This is much more a users manual for creative folk like myself that understand their process but are seeking a new perspective on communication and making meaningful impact.

“If you are willing to remake yourself, instead of just your marketing, then these principles can be used to accomplish remarkable things for your business.”

The overriding theme is that the mindset of how we do business must change for design professionals such as architects, planners, and builders.  I would include many more knowledge and creativity based professions as falling into this category; making the information in the book relevant to a much wider audience. The fact is that the environment in which we work has changed, we simply must decide if we will individually adapt to be relevant in this environment.

Unlike many books I have read on how to tap into social media, New Media For Designers + Builders gives a pertinent point of view in a context I understand. Being written from the perspective of a design professional, it speaks directly to real world strategies and applications in my field.   It would also apply to any ideas base organization looking to be effective in communicating their message and being relevant in the marketplace.

Reading this book through to the end takes a tremendous amount of discipline.  I could hardly go a page without finding pertinent information that I could utilize.  The temptation to drill down deep into a subject before finishing the entire book was mighty. This was my first experience with an electronic book so highly interlinked.  The links intuitively pull you deeper into each strategy.  In my case, I spent a day and a half down the blogging rabbit hole to unpack ways to  improve my own blog before moving on to the rest of the book.  Being a digital format book, every strategy, reference, or example is instantly accessible with examples and tips.

As easy as it is to drill for specifics, the real value for me was a guide into a framework or philosophy for the use of all these tools.  Exploring the “Age of the Idea” takes some of the concepts touched on by other forward thinkers such as Seth Godin and focuses them on the design and building professions. I can now see how to take my dabbling with my blog and twitter into a strategy to drive real business.

Having finished reading the book, my time with the book has just begun.  Each media node has a manual that explains how to start, refine and connect the system. I used to be concerned that putting my ideas out for others to see would be the worst possible business decisions. That is an old way of thinking.  I agree with Mouzon’s concepts that “patience, generosity, and connectedness” are valid business virtues for our new economy. With the enormous amount of energy we spend creating our passions, it is a shame if our platforms and practices for communication almost guarantee your voice not being heard.  This book is a manual for taking ideas to the audience where the ideas resonate.  Our business environment has changed, only we can decide how to adapt.  I will be using this book daily as I refine how my message can best be communicated.

I recommend New Media For Designers + Builders to anyone who has considered using the new medias to drive ideas.  In my case, I have been attempting to use social media for several months never realizing that each media (node) can feed the others, multiplying the content and connectivity drastically.  Another great aspect of the book for those of us into socio-spatial design, is a glimpse into the new media systems of some of the top thought leaders in our industry.  I found many ongoing resources that really exemplify generosity as a business virtue.

You can find the book at www.nm4db.com.   Steve Mouzon is an architect, urbanist, author, blogger, and photographer from Miami. He founded the New Urban Guild, which helped foster the Katrina Cottages movement. The Guild hosts Project:SmartDwelling, which works to redefine the house to be much smaller and more sustainable. Steve founded and is a board member of the Guild Foundation; it hosts the Original Green initiative. Steve speaks regularly across the US and abroad on sustainability issues. He blogs on the Original Green Blog and Useful Stuff. He also posts to the Original Green Twitter stream. While looking at Steve’s stuff be sure to explore The Original Green website at www.originalgreen.org.

Tourism System Cultures – Monoculture vs. Complementary Subcultures

David Twiggs

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As I have the opportunity to speak to many groups, I find there is often a misunderstanding of the types tourism systems and the degrees to which tourism should play a role in the economic development on a community. To build the economic development benefits of tourism while retaining the livability and character of a region, I am constantly promoting the development of tourism systems using the authentic natural assets and vernacular of the region. There is often a general low-grade fear of how tourism will impact a community. To understand the difference between types of tourism systems, it is important to look at the basics of how they develop. While there are always exceptions in tourism systems, I have found the majority use one of two models, the large–scale monoculture or the complementary subcultures.

Corporate Monoculture

In a corporate monoculture, we typically are setting a formulized stage for entertainment. It may be participatory entertainment but it is corporately structured. Monoculture developers usually want to find a blank slate to build the vision upon. In the worst cases, the monoculture may overwhelm and obliterate the authentic subcultures that preexisted the development. These corporate monocultures typically impose their model upon an area rather than enhance the pre-existing culture. Examples of these are the development surrounding monoculture attractions such as Vegas or the Disney properties.

In a monoculture, there is a single clear narrative to give the user an understanding of how they will structure their visit due to the narrow brand control. Very narrow but clear expectations are set. There will be peripheral service business development such as hotels, restaurants, and side activities but they still support the single narrative.

Complementary Subcultures

In complimentary subcultures, we typically focus on creating a system for belonging rather than entertainment. With community based tourism, we wish to enhance the organically occurring subcultures. In other words, be more of what we already want to be. We must remember, we are not trying to attract everyone in the world. Just those that are interested in our specific subcultures. This is much easier to do with the internet leveling the marketing playing field. These systems, draw on location based recreation sub-cultures. Take the North Carolina High Country as an much simplified example, the fly-fishing, golf, mountain biking, climbing, folk arts, and skiing subcultures all coexist to support and be supported by a vibrant culinary, music, and retail economy that ads to the livability of the region.

As with any economic driver, there will be impact on the community. Tourism development through complimentary sub-cultures creates opportunities for passion based entrepreneurs and small businesses that can have a relatively low barrier for entry. That said, if you are going to create the conditions to draw other peoples money; you must deal with other people. Proper planning and growth control are vital to retain the true flavor and livability of the region. You must know what level of growth is enough and build in the controls, lest you kill the goose.

There is nothing wrong with single attraction tourism in the correct setting. It is the big fish that many tourism developers seek as it falls into the corporate realm. This can be very beneficial creating opportunities for support business development; chain hotels, retail, and restaurants. It can also have the effect of concentrating tourism dollars creating many lower paying corporate jobs while the profits leave the community. It can force out the original population by destroying the historic economies and lifestyles. For the vast majority of small towns and rural areas, fostering a tourism economy based of complimentary sub-cultures if far mare preferable and controllable than the monoculture option.

Changing Destination Values

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Who wants to be treated like a tourist?  We are now faced with creating and recreating destination communities to meet a new set of values that have rapidly shifted from the prerecession model.  Perhaps it was the financial reality check that accelerated the already growing shift in values into the mainstream.  Many have shifted from seeking a tourist experience to wanting to feel belonging and experience self-discovery when we travel, invest in a second home or look for a quality place for retirement.

In 2009, Kurt Anderson began the conversation about a great reset in American values.  He and others speak of a “new frugality” that has resulted from values being shifted away from a consumption-based mentality. Conspicuous consumption has lost favor as a value proposition and is being replaced with a value for simpler honest and authentic experience.  This includes a shift away from credit-based lifestyle, which will slow our traditional metrics for economic growth.  Those metrics do not clearly recognize the vitality that can come from formally marginalized places being rediscovered and appreciated.  It doesn’t directly show the benefit of the local shops, restaurants, cafes and services being supported by a shift from corporate destination tourism to destination community based tourism patterns.

When we speak of a value shift, it begs the question “from what.” Dr. Brene Brown (brenebrown.com,) speaks of moving away from a culture where being preoccupied, over scheduled and over connected has become a status symbol and into living wholeheartedly. Technology, industrialization and automation of tasks that formally were part of basic home economics has both created a lifestyle free of what many consider preindustrial “drudgery” but it has also a disconnected us from the basic human processes of thousands of years.

In the past many experiences were designed to allow us escape into artificial environments. Now destinations should seek to bring us into a different rhythm, show us another lifestyle point of view or seek to connect us to nature and the basic systems of being human. The common denominator in this value shift to more authentic experiences is a desire for greater understanding, physical and spiritual growth and renewal. Traditional destination activities such as golf will still be an important element but we must also create spaces for adventure, meditation, and learning.  In looking at how to grow tourism or relocation in your community, don’t worry about trying to satisfy this vast array of potential interests, remember you are not trying to attract everyone, you want those visitors and new residents that appreciate the authentic culture of your community.  Be who you are.

The 1950’s began major mind shifts for the boomer generation. It could first be seen in basic home economics.  This time period held the rapid expansion of processed industrial food distribution.  Prior to this virtually all food was whole food and slow food.  While not necessarily organic, it had simpler inputs and no genetic modification.  Most meals required cooking which meant planning and most homes had at least a kitchen garden in the backyard.  Until  recently the majority of the United States population lived in a rural setting.  That is no longer the case.  The 1950’s marked a clear turning point from the valuing of the agrarian home economics and self-reliant thinking into a consumer based lifestyle ideal. A new ideal was being set for the American Dream.  Gardening and putting food by was now considered only for the poor.  The prosperous Americans bought the wonderful new prepackaged foods in the new supermarkets.

Traditional urban evolution gave way to an auto centric planning mentality. The growth of air conditioning allowed America to move inside and the personal connections made on the front porch diminished, as it was no longer the most comfortable place to be during the heat of the day.  From the 1950’s through the 1980’s, the mainstream American dream became substantially based on an auto centric, industrial food, air conditioned consumerism. Within a single generation we went from totally analog to a  digital culture, from segregated to diversity, from the local paper to the Internet, and from agrarianism to urbanism.

All these “conveniences” created a great insulator. As a nation, we were rapidly losing knowledge of the fundamentals that were basic to the generations before us.  It insulated us from the rhythms of nature. We had not the need to neither produce nor prepare our food.  It insulated us from a requirement to live a life of face-to-face connectivity. As described by Rowan Williams, the former Archbishop of Canterbury, we are losing the “craft of being a creature.”

It wasn’t simply that modern conveniences made America feel that traditional knowledge and skills we irrelevant.  Popular culture created an urban and suburban contempt for the agrarian lifestyle.  Proliferation of television created new images of the ideal lifestyle as one of ease, convenience and sophistication. The popular media portrayed the hayseed farmer, the bumpkin and other stereotypes showing ignorance of the rural class even though most Americans had much of their immediate family remaining in rural or semi-agrarian lifestyles. This was reinforced with a viewpoint of the good life consisting of Ward Cleaver and June heading off to the Country Club, Tony Nelson taking Jeannie to the Officers Club, or Thurston Howell the III getting Gilligan to help build the island golf club.  While these were designed for comic relief, they all permeated the illusion of the Norman Rockwell perfect traditional family setting down for Thanksgiving dinner or the Madison Avenue sophistication as the norm.  These juxtaposed stereotypes created both an inferiority complex and dissatisfaction with the agrarian lifestyle and a false sense of what would be a satisfying lifestyle.

Developers used this model to create early generation lifestyle destinations and rightly so.  They we simply responding to the general desires of the market as it had been conditioned.  Many of these destination developers actually did good forward thinking community planning considering general lack of sophistication in the planning worlds at the time.   These early destination communities were completely new creatures and that made them unique and attractive in themselves.  The same basic model proliferated throughout the US because the capital market and bankers understood the model.  During the last housing boom, the model accelerated with even less creativity, imagination, and quality of place.

After forty plus years of destination development: generic is no longer unique.  Status quo is unacceptable.  With the current value evolution or reset, a large segment of the baby boomer and following generations are changing their value judgment to balance modern techno bombardment with an organic connection to the natural world.  The value of access is surpassing the need for ownership.  Commonality and diversity are overtaking insular isolationism.  Paths are replacing fences. Gates are welcoming concierge stations rather than roadblocks to check you papers.  Gardens are valued as much as golf courses. The local has become the exotic.  The attraction for commoditized monoculture is being rapidly lost to the value of the unique, the individual, the handmade and extraordinary.

I personally feel the most encouraging changes come shift from consumerism to stewardship as a key personal value. “Stewardship is simply the caretaking of gifts” said Wendell Berry.  We must build our destination models on the stewardship of unique resources in order to build extraordinary places.  The loss of perceived value in the consumption of consumer products or the depletion of natural resources for our convenience has not changed universally.  It has changed dramatically for the markets we are attracting and our development practices will have to be adjusted accordingly.

Changes in Values

  • Cultural evolution from the 1950’s created a false sense of what builds a fulfilling lifestyle.
  • Destination models based on inauthentic lifestyle expectations are now experiencing a loss of relevance in the face of changing values.
  • Recent shifts in cultural values are moving away from conspicuous consumerism, hedonic and luxury based value perceptions.
  • Modern destinations must create opportunities for real connection and belonging with others,  with nature, and with the authentic quality of place to be successful.

wendell for wednesday

Wendell Berry. one of my favorite poets, on the sensibility of uniqueness and celebrating individualism.

grace garden

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Riding to Hounds: Understanding Subcultures In Community Building – David Twiggs

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Handmade community building is a people business.  It is intensely local and personal. It celebrates individualism. It draws creative types: artists and performers, athletes and philosophers, poets and farmers.  To use an intentional oxymoron, there are several categories of individuals that are involved with the destination community.  Some are your authentic homegrown tourism assets.  Others become your visitors and often your residents.  We need to understand these classifications to see how a subculture builds community.

  • The Obsessed/Wholehearted
  • The Interested
  • The Curious
  • The Casual

While all of these are important to the fabric of the community.  It is the Obsessed/ Wholehearted individuals that create the subculture. Yvonne Chounard, founder of Black Diamond Climbing and Patagonia lovingly calls the  hardcore climbing folks the “dirt bags.”  Like all the Obsessed, they will do whatever it takes to be where they can pursue their passion.  They spend their money on necessity of gear and the simple costs of getting and being there.  There are these cores in all outdoor sports.  These folks create the lore of the area.

All my wholehearted activities have always aimed for some combination of physical or spiritual growth.  Many of our passions are such because they bring us to focus on the “now” while allowing us to express the values we feel adds richness to our lives.  Much of meditation and contemplative practices bring us to an appreciation of now.  Not dwelling in the past or worrying the future.  While relaxation is part of our leisure goals we rarely want to spend all our time in a soporific state.  We more often are seeking the peak flow experience.

In my family, riding to hounds is our sporting tradition.  We enjoy many other outdoor pursuits but hunting hounds is the avocation that focuses the family energy and dictates the daily lifestyle.  We are wholehearted to be fully involved in training hounds, helping puppies be born, holding old hounds as the die of old age, walking out puppies and having it all coalesce on hunting days.

Riding to hounds is a good representative example of the authentic core developed in the obsessed/ wholehearted category.  These are the root activities that become the basis for strong subculture based tourism economies given the proper resources. These activities go beyond the generic theme park type attractions. It also goes beyond the active participants.  It is also embraced by the surrounding community and visitors curious about the lifestyle. This is recreation at its root; re-creation. These activities exist purely for the physical and spiritual benefit of the participant. These may be spectator sports but they are authentic to a true sub-culture.  These can contribute greatly to developing the authentic tourism brand. Like rock climbing, mountain biking, expedition, surfing, kayaking, fishing, equestrian or skiing, these subcultures are specialized and expect top conditions for their activity. Beyond the specialized activity, these subculture visitors require the same tourism support assets that any other activity does. They need housing, food, provisions and entertainment.  All the same elements that make living in a destination community desirable for other sub-cultures.

I will use riding to hounds as an analogy of how a relatively obscure activity adds to the tourism brand of region. While attracting locals and visitors year round for hound shows and riding out for hound exercise, the tradition peaks with the opening meet in early November.  We organize hundreds of community members  and visitors into wagons, moving them through miles of farm and forest lands.  We organized public wagons for those coming without reservations, reserved wagons for local residents and out of town visitors, corporately sponsored wagons for corporations bringing clients and employees furthering their business  opportunities.  These wagons are loaded down with picnic baskets and ice chests with the provision for a day afield.  We even have a special wagon of with bathroom facilities.

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Bringing The Community Together for Connection, Fellowship, and Joy

After the pageantry of the riders and hounds jumping into the grounds surrounded by visitors for the Blessing of the Hounds. The wagons follow a carefully designed route, stopping at preselected vistas for the mounted hunters in the traditional red coats thundering by.  The visitors sensory experience peaks as a hundred horses pass by jumping fences and galloping after pack of 50 hounds giving full voice after a scent line that we have carefully laid for the benefit of our audience.  This happens repeatedly over the course of the day as community and visitors enjoy food and cocktails on their wagons while moving through the beautiful countryside.  All this culminates just before sunset on Champagne Hill where riders, horses, hounds and visitors enjoy fellowship in the gloaming of the day before riding back to fireside barbeque.

A purist could see this as staged tourism event and they would have a point were it not for the authentic sporting culture and lifestyle that exists year round  This event is both authentic and appropriate to the tourism brand.  It is a rallying point that create community pride and belonging.

Understanding your core tourism customer is very important in natural resource / obsession activity based tourism development.  My family is a good example of the motivation and phycology of a recreational subculture.  As I write this I have just spent an entire day on horseback.  First to work on a new thoroughbred my wife has been training for me as a whip horse. Secondly the entire family rode out for one of our twice-weekly hunts on which we followed the hounds following a coyote for 50 minutes before he tired of us and tucked safely into his den.  After hacking back in, we were joined by members of the larger community for a potluck dinner.  The surrounding community proudly bring visiting family to see their hounds.

It is of no tangible value to hurl yourself and a fifteen hundred pound horse though narrow rutted trails, over ditches and fences at full gallop simply to hear the cry of the hounds. There is no trophy, we are not out to kill the fox, coyote or bobcat; nor is there a winner declared at the end of the day.  It is simply the total immersion in the “now.”  My wife who is passionate with the care, training and general happiness of the hounds calls this total focus on the “now” Kairos time or God’s Time.

Foxhunting in Time – Ashley Twiggs

Lately, the types of time keep occupying my thoughts.  Perhaps it’s because we are always so accessible, and so aware of many things other than what is right in front of us.  Or maybe it’s because my girls are growing up so fast that it really is making me stop and think.  Regardless, chronos and kairos time keep coming to mind.

Chronos is the time we live in; the real day to day time.  It is the seconds, minutes, and hours that make up our days, weeks, and years.  It’s the “how many minutes do we have till we need to be there?”  Dressed properly, tack oiled, and horses cleaned. Well, that’s questionable.  Thank goodness for our dirt colored horses.  As a mom of young riders, I naturally spend a lot of thought in chronos time.

Kairos is known as God’s time.  It’s the special glimpses in time that often pass too quickly.  It is the wrinkles in time when we are fully aware and present.  Those instances become something special.  Kairos is time outside of time; those magical moments when time seems to stand still, etched in mind.  Those are the ones we truly cherish.

Foxhunting with children certainly embodies both types.  Often, I am  caught up in the tasks of getting four people and four horses ready for the days’ hunt. It’s easy to get lost in the small details of tack, saddle pads, gloves, garters, hairnets, etc.  There are many things to check and get ready, and then on to tack up our four horses.  Chronos is when I’m late and I snap at someone to bring the right girth, to find a clean pair of riding pants, and “why are you already so dirty?” I admit that sometimes, by the time we are all finally there and on our horses,  it’s hard to “let it go” and truly enjoy the experience that I’ve been diligently preparing us for.

But when I look back on years of hunting, I remember not the chaotic moments of making it come together; but the kairos time of the best of the day.  It is the other small, but special, details.  Those are what I cherish.  When we’ve stopped on a run and I look over to see Salem’s breath in the cold air, the pink of her cheeks, and I see the excitement in her eyes.  It’s when CeCe hears the hounds in full cry and tells me she has goose bumps.  I know she understands the significance.  It’s when I was whipping in with David and I stop the hounds at the right moment.  I can still see their faces looking up at me.  Kairos is being fully present and aware, and a part of the big picture; no matter where we ride that day. 

The gift that we’re giving our girls is being able to spend a day riding to hounds and to appreciate the quiet and wild beauty of nature and sport.  They are forming their own kairos moments. Thank you, God. Kairos. Whether hunting for ourselves or with our children, we all have our kairos moments.  It’s up to us to recognize and appreciate their gift; and to be ever so grateful.

To those who participate in obsession activities, the time spent is contemplative, meditative and yet has the physiological levels of stress response that make us feel exhilarated and alive.  I have described one element of riding to hounds as a focused nature meditation which is actually having your mind and body completely tuning in on every sound smell and movement in the forest and rivers, every shift in the breeze, and even feeling the changes in barometric pressure and ionization of the air.  Each of these refining your intuition of moment.

This is what ancient cultures called being in rhythm with nature. Ancient as in before we self-incarcerated ourselves to our air-conditioned television rooms. This comes from being exposed to nature to the degree that it changes your internal rhythms.  Not being in rhythm to the clock and schedules of chronos time.  This is the meandering of your brain synapses though the collection of experiences, knowledge, and the unconsciously received signals from being in rhythm with the nature.  All this  culminating into intuition and ideas.  It is that which creates that inate “I just have a feeling about this” where we are in tune with nature, engrossed in the “now.” The contemplative part of what Ashley calls Kairos time.

But most obsession activities do not simply strive for a zen soporific state of mind. A point of commitment is crossed. Beyond this point is only instinct, intuition, physical endurance and gut reaction.   That may be that first dropping of your ski tips over the steep lip of an untried basin.  It may be digging your paddle in to spin your kayak into that technical section of water.  The physiological stress and pleasure responses start firing. Adrenaline and dopamine flow; different areas of the brain engage.

The second element to Kairos time is just beyond the Point of Commitment.  You are in a meditative state soaking in the natural rhythms, when the first hound speaks, then another, and then the entire pack smells the scent trail of a coyote, bobcat or fox.  What ensues from here I liken to a combination of a horizontal free-fall on horseback and an abandonment of self-direction to the whims of nature, geography, landscape.  This is primal joy.

Fear evaporates; you are not even cognoscente of your horse.  You flow through the countryside instinctively picking your path based on the sound of the running pack.  On lucky occasions, you are blessed to run amongst the hounds galloping with the coyote in sight ahead of you but never knowing where the next direction may be.  It is not about what you want.  There is nothing under your control.  You are blessed to be a spectator of an ancient play.  The actors are the natural instincts and physicality of the animals and they have been playing out this scene for millennia. The coyote’s superior knowledge of his home area and the hounds drive to follow the scent. I have followed them on circle after circle in one square mile before the coyote ducks back into one of his dens.  I also have followed them on a 14 mile points never making a turn.  When that first hounds speaks, we know not what direction we may go, what duration we may run nor what obstacles we may encounter. We humans are not necessary to the play.   It is this state of flow that motivates the Obsessed / Wholehearted to create the lifestyle that draws others.

When my family decided to move to this region, we chose to live in an area where riding to hounds shared space with other complimentary subcultures that were also important in the lifestyle of the region.  In our hunting country, we coexist with golf, housing, shooting sports, farms, and a small airport.  The combination of all these activities created a diverse engaged community. The branding brings high quality visitors from throughout the United States and Canada.  These visitors bring a large lodging, rental and second home market with them as well as additional business for area retailers and restaurants.  Many of these visitors now consider the region their second home.  There is a diverse authentic lifestyle that creates the culture of the community.

When developing a destination community, having conditions that attract and engage the obsessed and wholehearted will attract the Interested, the Curious and the Casual. Where I say Riding to Hounds, insert your own combination of activities.  Sporting Clays, Golf, Trail Running, Paddling or any flow inducing activity conducive to place. Any activity that authentically fits into the nature of your landscape to create those unique lifestyle opportunities will help you create a more diverse destination community.

Community Builder or Consumer – David Twiggs

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To build an extraordinary destination community, we must realize our residents and visitors want to belong to a community rather than simply be a consumer.  We must create the seeds for citizenship.  We are often faced with a culture of community consumers not a group of contributing citizen community builders.

I spent 18 years living and working in the North Carolina High Country in the Blowing Rock, Beech Mountain and Linville triangle.  In this area, there was a proliferation of communities being built to meet the in migration, second home and rental housing demand.  Many of these were very well done creating a community personality that added to the cultural richness of the community.  While these were clearly defined areas they were relatively porous allowing exchange of communication, ideas, and commonality.   These communities were generally considered to be good engaged neighbors.

Other communities developed into isolationist monocultures that were generally considered unwelcome even after many years of existence.  These fostered the” Us vs. Them” mentality.  While they were successful real estate development projects in that they sold through and made the developer a lot of money.  They were not necessarily successful in adding to the long-term health of the larger community.

Consumers are like investors in a stock.  As long as the community is thriving, they receive their dividends in the form of quantity of amenity per dollar paid in taxes, dues, or fees and in increased property values when they decide to sell their investment.  Just like in stocks, owners change on a daily basis. If their dividends are not what they expect, they sell the investment. Since a community’s major dividend has been the lifestyle and perceived quality of life, the same dividend may leave one investor unimpressed while going beyond another’s expectations. A community cannot be all things to all people. It must enhance its unique qualities and values and seek those to whom the lifestyle resonates.  The one constant is that the people will eventually change.  With this come two schools of thought.

The American zeitgeist on what is considered of value is now shifting towards a citizenship point if view.  In response, we had better set up policies, governance and traditions that foster the unique authentic value in our community.  While enhancing and preserving, we also must celebrate individualism within that framework.

From a consumer point of view, there had better be something to attract the next purchaser for their business, home or property; the next “investor.”  While recent years has seen a decline in the investor mentality as a primary motivator for choosing real estate purchases, the change model holds true.  It is the value proposition that has changed.  People are looking for authentic lifestyle and an atmosphere that helps them become a contributing part of the community.

The mindset of a destination community being simply a marketable amenity delivery system has to change if a community is to thrive. In funding new development, the purchase and flip investor mentality made pre-construction sales to investors a reliable funding option until about 2008.  This has changed particularly if a destination wants to attract in migration in the second home and retirement markets.  We are now focused on an end user, a citizen, which is much more concerned with the authentic community values than the marketability of the real estate in the future.

Community must be defined as collection of human relationships rather than as a defined real estate space.  Many of the early pioneer destination communities were built with these more humanistic goals in mind.  In the 90’s and 00’s, many designs strayed for these values.  Creating fortified islands of monoculture did much harm to the traditional meaning of community.  The truly extraordinary places designed the governance structure to add value and enhance the region’s authentic nature.  This goes beyond the physical design of the neighborhoods.  There are many extraordinary places that have technical design issues that they continue to deal with as knowledge on neighborhood and civic space design evolves.  These places are extraordinary because the citizens are part of the positive regional dynamic rather than a separate protectionist subculture.

Now that some of our early pioneer associations are reaching 30 to 40 years old, we are starting to see some multigenerational ownership beginning.  Up until recently no current owners where born and raised in their community.  It was a created environment based on a theme that was quickly put in place rather than slowly evolving with the nature of the area.  There were no roots to speak of that would build a sense of citizenship as opposed to walking into a readymade ala carte consumer environment.  Mixed generation communities have faired much better over recent years than age restricted or retirement type communities.  Mutigenerational populations tend to vest much more quickly into the total community environment, both within and outside the association scope.  This is beginning to alleviate some of the challenges faced due to a transient consumer mindset that has been prevalent in community associations.

Boomers are not necessarily joiners.  The value of being a “member” is not nearly as prevalent as with prior generations.  There is much more value placed on being an individual engaged citizen.  This does not mean that the Boomer will not use the amenities of a community.  They may very well be more active than prior generations but the do not want any part of their “parents retirement community.”  They want to live in a community that engages their children and grandchildren as a family unit and individuals.  They want a “cool” factor.  There must be a new mental narrative about the community. They envision their grandchildren saying “let’s visit grandpa, he lives in the coolest place”. This is what the successful community of the future will be conjure in the mind.

A primary challenge is developing a real sense of citizenship.  Consumers look at the cost/benefit now and seek to extract as much product as possible for the least cost.  Citizen community builders have a longer look as they take responsibility in growing their community.  The sense of being a builder not simply a consumer is what builds community within our members.