Moving Ideas to Start-ups in Master Planned Communities  David Twiggs AICP

Moving Ideas to Start-ups in Master Planned Communities David Twiggs AICP

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Micro Neighborhood Infill Concept Drawing By Dr. Yang Luo Director of Placemaking Hot Springs Village AR

The only way large-scale communities can move beyond their outdated and market irrelevant pre recession status quo is to become remarkable in a sea of mediocre competitors. This requires developing new ideas, programs, and facilities and taking them to startup mode quickly. Starting is the hardest thing for an individual to do in a bureaucratic, fearful, and hypercritical environment.

This typically is an environment that will debate an idea endlessly in search of perfection; seeking guarantees and prepositioned blame for anything less than a grand slam idea. This is not forward thinking and not applicable for running the nimble businesses we must be post recession market.

Startups aren’t about perfection. They are about taking an idea to the market while it can make an impact. We take an idea, put together a plan, put it on the market, evaluate, and revise. We continue to revise until the product succeeds or fails but we are in the marketplace while it can make a difference. Obviously the higher the cost of failure, the greater the preparation before launch but an idea that is never launched will not succeed and you will learn nothing. An idea launched to late, after it has been proven in other communities, does nothing to make you remarkable. That just makes you a follower trying to keep up with the bold communities.

I believe in due diligence but many start-up opportunities are lost by over caution and collective fear of failure. A start-up designed to make a planned community remarkable is by definition something that others are not doing. If you can find five of your competitors to compare how this idea worked for them, you are simply a follower behind the curve. You are not inventing or innovating anything.

Look at Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and determine what level need your community is supplying. The higher up the need you are satisfying, the more remarkable and marketable you are. You will not satisfy everyone as you reach for a higher level. You can never satisfy everyone. Timid community leadership will at best keep their head down and try nothing that is unproved. At their worst they will actively criticize those who will try saying it is not the responsibility of the association. Criticism is only aimed at the bold who standout.

Any manager can follow the manual and dodge criticism. Professional community leaders are paid to create bold new directions. Intuition and courage are the traits to seek in hiring people as game changers. These people will start things. Some things will fail, but fast cheap failures are part of the business process. If I have ten startups and two fail, the failing ideas will get criticized. Is my community better off for the eight new innovative programs and facilities I succeeded with or should I have protected myself by not launching anything that had a risk of failure. If you believe you are doing the right thing, be tough and take the criticism. Being bold is much more fun and in the long run the only way to create extraordinary places.