Riding to Hounds: Understanding Subcultures In Community Building – David Twiggs

Image

Handmade community building is a people business.  It is intensely local and personal. It celebrates individualism. It draws creative types: artists and performers, athletes and philosophers, poets and farmers.  To use an intentional oxymoron, there are several categories of individuals that are involved with the destination community.  Some are your authentic homegrown tourism assets.  Others become your visitors and often your residents.  We need to understand these classifications to see how a subculture builds community.

  • The Obsessed/Wholehearted
  • The Interested
  • The Curious
  • The Casual

While all of these are important to the fabric of the community.  It is the Obsessed/ Wholehearted individuals that create the subculture. Yvonne Chounard, founder of Black Diamond Climbing and Patagonia lovingly calls the  hardcore climbing folks the “dirt bags.”  Like all the Obsessed, they will do whatever it takes to be where they can pursue their passion.  They spend their money on necessity of gear and the simple costs of getting and being there.  There are these cores in all outdoor sports.  These folks create the lore of the area.

All my wholehearted activities have always aimed for some combination of physical or spiritual growth.  Many of our passions are such because they bring us to focus on the “now” while allowing us to express the values we feel adds richness to our lives.  Much of meditation and contemplative practices bring us to an appreciation of now.  Not dwelling in the past or worrying the future.  While relaxation is part of our leisure goals we rarely want to spend all our time in a soporific state.  We more often are seeking the peak flow experience.

In my family, riding to hounds is our sporting tradition.  We enjoy many other outdoor pursuits but hunting hounds is the avocation that focuses the family energy and dictates the daily lifestyle.  We are wholehearted to be fully involved in training hounds, helping puppies be born, holding old hounds as the die of old age, walking out puppies and having it all coalesce on hunting days.

Riding to hounds is a good representative example of the authentic core developed in the obsessed/ wholehearted category.  These are the root activities that become the basis for strong subculture based tourism economies given the proper resources. These activities go beyond the generic theme park type attractions. It also goes beyond the active participants.  It is also embraced by the surrounding community and visitors curious about the lifestyle. This is recreation at its root; re-creation. These activities exist purely for the physical and spiritual benefit of the participant. These may be spectator sports but they are authentic to a true sub-culture.  These can contribute greatly to developing the authentic tourism brand. Like rock climbing, mountain biking, expedition, surfing, kayaking, fishing, equestrian or skiing, these subcultures are specialized and expect top conditions for their activity. Beyond the specialized activity, these subculture visitors require the same tourism support assets that any other activity does. They need housing, food, provisions and entertainment.  All the same elements that make living in a destination community desirable for other sub-cultures.

I will use riding to hounds as an analogy of how a relatively obscure activity adds to the tourism brand of region. While attracting locals and visitors year round for hound shows and riding out for hound exercise, the tradition peaks with the opening meet in early November.  We organize hundreds of community members  and visitors into wagons, moving them through miles of farm and forest lands.  We organized public wagons for those coming without reservations, reserved wagons for local residents and out of town visitors, corporately sponsored wagons for corporations bringing clients and employees furthering their business  opportunities.  These wagons are loaded down with picnic baskets and ice chests with the provision for a day afield.  We even have a special wagon of with bathroom facilities.

Image

Bringing The Community Together for Connection, Fellowship, and Joy

After the pageantry of the riders and hounds jumping into the grounds surrounded by visitors for the Blessing of the Hounds. The wagons follow a carefully designed route, stopping at preselected vistas for the mounted hunters in the traditional red coats thundering by.  The visitors sensory experience peaks as a hundred horses pass by jumping fences and galloping after pack of 50 hounds giving full voice after a scent line that we have carefully laid for the benefit of our audience.  This happens repeatedly over the course of the day as community and visitors enjoy food and cocktails on their wagons while moving through the beautiful countryside.  All this culminates just before sunset on Champagne Hill where riders, horses, hounds and visitors enjoy fellowship in the gloaming of the day before riding back to fireside barbeque.

A purist could see this as staged tourism event and they would have a point were it not for the authentic sporting culture and lifestyle that exists year round  This event is both authentic and appropriate to the tourism brand.  It is a rallying point that create community pride and belonging.

Understanding your core tourism customer is very important in natural resource / obsession activity based tourism development.  My family is a good example of the motivation and phycology of a recreational subculture.  As I write this I have just spent an entire day on horseback.  First to work on a new thoroughbred my wife has been training for me as a whip horse. Secondly the entire family rode out for one of our twice-weekly hunts on which we followed the hounds following a coyote for 50 minutes before he tired of us and tucked safely into his den.  After hacking back in, we were joined by members of the larger community for a potluck dinner.  The surrounding community proudly bring visiting family to see their hounds.

It is of no tangible value to hurl yourself and a fifteen hundred pound horse though narrow rutted trails, over ditches and fences at full gallop simply to hear the cry of the hounds. There is no trophy, we are not out to kill the fox, coyote or bobcat; nor is there a winner declared at the end of the day.  It is simply the total immersion in the “now.”  My wife who is passionate with the care, training and general happiness of the hounds calls this total focus on the “now” Kairos time or God’s Time.

Foxhunting in Time – Ashley Twiggs

Lately, the types of time keep occupying my thoughts.  Perhaps it’s because we are always so accessible, and so aware of many things other than what is right in front of us.  Or maybe it’s because my girls are growing up so fast that it really is making me stop and think.  Regardless, chronos and kairos time keep coming to mind.

Chronos is the time we live in; the real day to day time.  It is the seconds, minutes, and hours that make up our days, weeks, and years.  It’s the “how many minutes do we have till we need to be there?”  Dressed properly, tack oiled, and horses cleaned. Well, that’s questionable.  Thank goodness for our dirt colored horses.  As a mom of young riders, I naturally spend a lot of thought in chronos time.

Kairos is known as God’s time.  It’s the special glimpses in time that often pass too quickly.  It is the wrinkles in time when we are fully aware and present.  Those instances become something special.  Kairos is time outside of time; those magical moments when time seems to stand still, etched in mind.  Those are the ones we truly cherish.

Foxhunting with children certainly embodies both types.  Often, I am  caught up in the tasks of getting four people and four horses ready for the days’ hunt. It’s easy to get lost in the small details of tack, saddle pads, gloves, garters, hairnets, etc.  There are many things to check and get ready, and then on to tack up our four horses.  Chronos is when I’m late and I snap at someone to bring the right girth, to find a clean pair of riding pants, and “why are you already so dirty?” I admit that sometimes, by the time we are all finally there and on our horses,  it’s hard to “let it go” and truly enjoy the experience that I’ve been diligently preparing us for.

But when I look back on years of hunting, I remember not the chaotic moments of making it come together; but the kairos time of the best of the day.  It is the other small, but special, details.  Those are what I cherish.  When we’ve stopped on a run and I look over to see Salem’s breath in the cold air, the pink of her cheeks, and I see the excitement in her eyes.  It’s when CeCe hears the hounds in full cry and tells me she has goose bumps.  I know she understands the significance.  It’s when I was whipping in with David and I stop the hounds at the right moment.  I can still see their faces looking up at me.  Kairos is being fully present and aware, and a part of the big picture; no matter where we ride that day. 

The gift that we’re giving our girls is being able to spend a day riding to hounds and to appreciate the quiet and wild beauty of nature and sport.  They are forming their own kairos moments. Thank you, God. Kairos. Whether hunting for ourselves or with our children, we all have our kairos moments.  It’s up to us to recognize and appreciate their gift; and to be ever so grateful.

To those who participate in obsession activities, the time spent is contemplative, meditative and yet has the physiological levels of stress response that make us feel exhilarated and alive.  I have described one element of riding to hounds as a focused nature meditation which is actually having your mind and body completely tuning in on every sound smell and movement in the forest and rivers, every shift in the breeze, and even feeling the changes in barometric pressure and ionization of the air.  Each of these refining your intuition of moment.

This is what ancient cultures called being in rhythm with nature. Ancient as in before we self-incarcerated ourselves to our air-conditioned television rooms. This comes from being exposed to nature to the degree that it changes your internal rhythms.  Not being in rhythm to the clock and schedules of chronos time.  This is the meandering of your brain synapses though the collection of experiences, knowledge, and the unconsciously received signals from being in rhythm with the nature.  All this  culminating into intuition and ideas.  It is that which creates that inate “I just have a feeling about this” where we are in tune with nature, engrossed in the “now.” The contemplative part of what Ashley calls Kairos time.

But most obsession activities do not simply strive for a zen soporific state of mind. A point of commitment is crossed. Beyond this point is only instinct, intuition, physical endurance and gut reaction.   That may be that first dropping of your ski tips over the steep lip of an untried basin.  It may be digging your paddle in to spin your kayak into that technical section of water.  The physiological stress and pleasure responses start firing. Adrenaline and dopamine flow; different areas of the brain engage.

The second element to Kairos time is just beyond the Point of Commitment.  You are in a meditative state soaking in the natural rhythms, when the first hound speaks, then another, and then the entire pack smells the scent trail of a coyote, bobcat or fox.  What ensues from here I liken to a combination of a horizontal free-fall on horseback and an abandonment of self-direction to the whims of nature, geography, landscape.  This is primal joy.

Fear evaporates; you are not even cognoscente of your horse.  You flow through the countryside instinctively picking your path based on the sound of the running pack.  On lucky occasions, you are blessed to run amongst the hounds galloping with the coyote in sight ahead of you but never knowing where the next direction may be.  It is not about what you want.  There is nothing under your control.  You are blessed to be a spectator of an ancient play.  The actors are the natural instincts and physicality of the animals and they have been playing out this scene for millennia. The coyote’s superior knowledge of his home area and the hounds drive to follow the scent. I have followed them on circle after circle in one square mile before the coyote ducks back into one of his dens.  I also have followed them on a 14 mile points never making a turn.  When that first hounds speaks, we know not what direction we may go, what duration we may run nor what obstacles we may encounter. We humans are not necessary to the play.   It is this state of flow that motivates the Obsessed / Wholehearted to create the lifestyle that draws others.

When my family decided to move to this region, we chose to live in an area where riding to hounds shared space with other complimentary subcultures that were also important in the lifestyle of the region.  In our hunting country, we coexist with golf, housing, shooting sports, farms, and a small airport.  The combination of all these activities created a diverse engaged community. The branding brings high quality visitors from throughout the United States and Canada.  These visitors bring a large lodging, rental and second home market with them as well as additional business for area retailers and restaurants.  Many of these visitors now consider the region their second home.  There is a diverse authentic lifestyle that creates the culture of the community.

When developing a destination community, having conditions that attract and engage the obsessed and wholehearted will attract the Interested, the Curious and the Casual. Where I say Riding to Hounds, insert your own combination of activities.  Sporting Clays, Golf, Trail Running, Paddling or any flow inducing activity conducive to place. Any activity that authentically fits into the nature of your landscape to create those unique lifestyle opportunities will help you create a more diverse destination community.

Advertisements

One thought on “Riding to Hounds: Understanding Subcultures In Community Building – David Twiggs

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s